Tips and Tricks

Here are a few tricks that you can follow to ensure your writing is the best it can be:

  • Don’t be precious about your writing. If a sentence doesn’t work, rewrite it or take it out.
  • Be real in your writing. Don’t add big words or business jargon just to impress. Your writing is most effective when you keep your message simple and clear.
  • Ask yourself if anything can be removed, reworded, or reorganized to make your message stronger.

Nvoicepay Vocab Glossary

Download the Operations Glossary for more NVP vocabulary.

Accounts payable 

Type out 'accounts payable' on the first usage. Use ‘AP’ thereafter. Can use ‘AP’ in titles. Do not use a slash (eg. ‘A/P’). Accounts payable is not capitalized unless in a title. 'Accounts' may be capitalized if it's at the start of a sentence.

AP Assist

Use ‘AP Assist’ when referring to our product—not APAssist. 'Assist' is always capitalized, since it's a proper noun.

AP automation

When using 'AP automation,' 'automation' is never capitalized unless it's in a title.

AP Gateway

Use ‘AP Gateway’ when referring to our product—not APGateway, APGateWay, AP GateWay, or AP Gate Way. 'Gateway' is always capitalized, since it's a proper noun.

B2B

Use ‘B2B’ not b2b,  b-to-b, or B-to-B. Note the use of capitalization. B2B refers to business to business—as opposed to business to consumer (B2C)—the context is around the relationship.

Back end and back-end

Two words. Do not hyphenate unless using as an adjective before a noun. (e.g. "We offer support on the back end" and "we offer back-end support" are both correct uses.)

Back office and back-office

Two words. Do not hyphenate unless using as an adjective before a noun. (e.g. "We offer support for the back office" and "we offer back-office support" are both correct uses.)

Bottom line 

Two words. Do not hyphenate unless using as an adjective before a noun. (e.g. "Here are the bottom-line results" and "Let's look at the bottom line" are both correct uses.)

Client

Interchangeable with 'customer.' 'Customer' is preferred in most cases, but it can vary depending on the industry. Don't mix uses in writing; stick with one and use it throughout your piece.

  • This is a gray area since our suppliers are also clients. You may want to refer to suppliers as clients when speaking directly to them, but make the distinction when speaking internally, or to our clients from the AP side. 

Cloud-based

Include hyphen. Do not refer to Nvoicepay products or services as SaaS.

Cross-border

Not cross border or x-border. 'Cross-border payments' and 'international payments' are interchangeable, but we prefer 'cross-border.' Don’t mix uses in writing; stick with one and use it throughout.

C-suite

Always capitalize the letter-C regardless of usage (e.g., title case, sentence case).

Customer

Interchangeable with 'client.' 'Customer' is preferred in most cases, but it can vary depending on the industry. Don't mix uses in writing; stick with one and use it throughout your piece.

  • This is a gray area since our suppliers are also customers. You may want to refer to suppliers as customers when speaking directly to them, but make the distinction when speaking internally, or to our customers from the AP side. 

Electronic Payments and ePayments

Spell out the first occurrence then use shorthand form; note uppercase P in ‘ePayments.’

Financial technology and fintech

Spell out the first occurrence then use shorthand form; note lowercase form of ‘fintech.’

Front end and front-end

Two words. Do not hyphenate unless using as an adjective before a noun. (e.g. "We offer support on the front end" and "we offer front-end support" are both correct uses.)

Great Plains

See 'Microsoft Dynamics GP'

Healthcare

Not 'health care’ (with a space).

Job site

Two words. Do not hyphenate unless using as an adjective before a noun. (e.g. 'Let's go to the job site' and 'confront your job-site woes' are both correct uses.)

Mastercard®

Not MasterCard, Master Card, Master card.

Microsoft Dynamics GP®

Write out 'Microsoft Dynamics GP' for the first mention and use 'Dynamics GP' for all further mentions. Formerly known as 'Great Plains'--do not use this name.

NetSuite®

Not Netsuite, netsuite, Net Suite.

Nvoicepay®

Use 'Nvoicepay', not 'nvoicepay' or 'NVoicePay'. There are no spaces in the name.

  • While it's acceptable to shorten Nvoicepay to 'NVP' internally, please refrain from doing so in external documentation, particularly to customers, suppliers, or in published works, unless it is part of a name, like 'NVP Card.'
  • 'NVoicePay' is an old spelling. Please contact Marketing (marketing@nvoicepay.com) if you notice this variation in any official documentation.

NVP Card®

Use ‘NVP Card’ when referring to Nvoicepay’s branded credit card—not NVPCard.

P2P

Use ‘P2P’, not p2p. Note the use of capitalization.  P2P refers to procure to pay—the process that is the accounts payable workflow. Procurement begins with the creation of a purchase order; the process concludes with the issuance of payment.

P-card and p-card

Not Pcard, PCard, or P Card. This refers to the credit card used exclusively to pay suppliers. P-card is also used to substitute 'virtual card.'

Percent

Use ‘percent’ instead of the %-symbol. Only use %-symbol in titles.

SaaS

Use ‘SaaS’ not Saas or saas or S.A.A.S. or S.a.a.S. Note the capitalization and lack of periods. Expand the acronym on the first usage unless used in a title. (SaaS = software as a service).

Start-up

Never use the term ‘start-up’ or equivalent when referring to Nvoicepay. It doesn’t instill confidence and trust our customers expect in a company handling billions of their dollars in payments. 

Supplier

Interchangeable with 'vendor.' 'Supplier' is preferred in most cases, but it can vary depending on the industry. Don't mix uses in writing; stick with one and use it throughout your piece.

Their

Use the genderless 'their' instead of 'his or her.' (e.g. 'We support your accounts payable representative with their workload' is correct. 'We support your accounts payable representative with his or her workload' is not correct.)

V-card or v-card 

Not Vcard, VCard, or V Card. This refers to the credit card used exclusively to pay suppliers. 

Vendor

Interchangeable with 'supplier.' 'Supplier' is preferred in most cases, but it can vary depending on the industry. Don't mix uses in writing; stick with one and use it throughout your piece.

Vista by Viewpoint®

Use 'Vista by Viewpoint' for first mention and 'Vista' for all other mentions.

  • Not Viewpoint Vista, View Point Vista, ViewPoint and Vista
  • This is separate from our product, Viewpoint ePayments, which is the version of AP Gateway used by Vista customers.

White paper

Two words, lowercase, when used to refer to a special report. 

Spelling and Grammar

AP Style

Nvoicepay follows the AP Stylebook unless otherwise specified in the NVP Style Guide. The online AP Stylebook can be found here, but requires an account to log in. Click here and here for free AP style cheat sheets. When in doubt, a quick Google search generally gets you the answer you need. If you are still unsure or have an example that isn't covered in the AP Stylebook, contact the marketing department (marketing@nvoicepay.com) for assistance.

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Apostrophes

Apostrophes indicate possessives (e.g. Kyle's) or contractions (e.g. shouldn't, you're)

  • Common misuses: 1970's, ERP's. These are incorrect.
    • The correct spelling is: 1970s, ERPs
    • The only exception to this rule is when using it with the plural form of lower case letters: "Dot your i's and cross your t's" is correct.
  • When adding apostrophes to plural nouns that end with 's,' place the apostrophe at the end of the word.
    • Example: We cater to our customers' individual needs.

Capitalization

We alternate between title case and sentence case. 

  • Title case: capitalize the first letter of every word in a set of words with the following exceptions:
    • Never capitalize the following words (unless it’s the first word in a sentence): and, as, at, but, for, from, if, in, into, nor, of, off, on, onto, or, so, to, up, with, when, yet, the

  • Sentence case: capitalize only the first letter of the first word in a phrase or sentence.

Use title case for:

  • Button copy/CTAs with three or fewer words (use sentence case if over three words)
  • Blog headlines

Use sentence case for:

  • Email subject lines
  • Button copy over three words 
  • Website headlines and subheads

When capitalizing job roles and departments, capitalize the role if it is used as a formal title, but keep it lower case in all other instances, except if it starts a sentence. Do not capitalize job titles before names.

The following examples are all correct:

  • "President George Washington did not actually cut down a cherry tree."
  • "The president did not actually cut down a cherry tree."
  • "The accounts payable team worked all week to make sure the checks got out on time."

Commas

Nvoicepay observes commas as used in the AP Stylebook, as well as the Oxford comma. This comma helps clarify meaning.

  • Correct: I invited my parents, Abraham Lincoln, and Shirley Temple. 
  • Incorrect: I invited my parents, Abraham Lincoln and Shirley Temple.
    • (Abraham Lincoln and Shirley Temple are not my parents.)

Dashes and hyphens

Hyphens

Indicates two words that are linked together.

  • back-office operations
  • blue-eyed woman

To type a hyphen, type the hyphen button on your keyboard.

N-dashes 

Indicates a range. Generally, Nvoicepay doesn't use N-dashes, substituting hyphens in their place.

  • July–December
  • 25–100

To type an N-dash, hold Alt and type 0150 on your keypad (PC) or Option and the minus key (Mac).

M-dashes 

Used in place of commas, colons, semicolons, or parenthesis.

  • The professor—who had never taken an art class—found herself teaching beginner art students 
  • The new law added necessary restrictions—and rightly so!

To type an M-dash, type two subsequent hyphens, followed by your next word with no space in between. (--) Microsoft software auto-corrects to an M-dash. Alternatively, hold Alt and type 0151 on your keypad (PC) or Shift and Option keys and the minus key (Mac).

Numbers and dates

  • Use AP style in body copy. Spell out zero through nine. 
    • Use natural/whole numbers in blog headlines/subheads, email subject lines, and CTAs.
  • Abbreviate August through February. Spell out March through July:
    • Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov., Dec., Jan., Feb., March, April, May, June, July

Numbered lists style

Use a cardinal followed by a period when setting up a list. Example: 

1.

2.

3. etc...

Email subject lines

Must be under 50 characters.

Word choice suggestions

The way we write says a lot about us. In most cases, less is more. Use these tricks to create stronger, concise sentences.

  • Use "enables" in place of "allows." Nvoicepay helps our customers do their work, we don't allow them to do their work.
    • Avoid: Nvoicepay allows our customers to improve their AP processes.
    • Use: Nvoicepay enables our customers to improve their AP processes.
  • Limit the use of "helps to."
    • Avoid: "Nvoicepay helps to reduce time spent on AP tasks." 
    • Use: "Nvoicepay reduces time spent on AP tasks."
  • Switch words around.
    • Avoid: "Stop using those manual processes of yours."
    • Use: "Stop using manual processes."
  • Avoid passive voice.
    • Avoid: "Their picture was taken at the holiday party."
    • Use: "Someone took their picture at the holiday party."
  • Use past tense instead of past participle tense.
    • Avoid: "They had been perfecting their elevator speech."
    • Use: "They had perfected their elevator speech," or, even better; "They perfected their elevator speech."